ASCCC Survey Yields Encouraging Results for Pathways Stakeholders

woman taking survey

The ASCCC Guided Pathways Task Force recently completed a survey to identify faculty needs and perceptions of this statewide initiative as it attempts to create a framework to better support positive student and institutional outcomes.

According to Dr. Janet Fulks, Professor of Biology at Bakersfield College and ASCCC Guided Pathways Capacity Building Faculty Lead, “The survey provides valuable information, directly from senate presidents, that is primarily positive and clarifies opportunities and needs that will be addressed in order to help implement Guided Pathways.”

In spring 2018, the survey was sent to faculty senate presidents and responses were collected from 62 different colleges. Overall, the ASCCC is pleased to report that data shows a positive assessment of the Guided Pathways framework, with 98.4 percent of all respondents saying that there was “significant,” “quite a bit” or “some interest” among faculty in the program’s mission and practices. College-wide interest in implementing the Guided Pathways framework is as high as 97 percent, with 72 percent choosing “quite a bit” and “strong interest.”

Numerous comments about implementing this institution-wide vision identified the importance of local collaboration and communication. Faculty indicated that resources and examples of best practices were still hard to find but would be beneficial. A fairly specific list of potential resources were specified for starters and colleges indicated practices they are willing to share.

Respondents were also asked to comment on their understanding of the potential positive and negative effects of the Guided Pathways program. Positive observations included, “GP Framework allows student-oriented transformation,” “closes equity gaps,” “more career-focused curriculum,” and “increased retention and persistence.” Respondents also raised such concerns as “loss of faculty autonomy,” “eliminates exploration,” and “lack of choice may limit student autonomy.”